nascent artifacts

2headedsnake:

Eugenia Loli

Sherlock Jr. (1924)
Directed by Buster Keaton

Story of my life (minus the part about being a detective, mostly the part where I fall asleep in a projection booth)

Digital Dance (1982)
A wonderful example of early computerized video editing. Unlike John Whitney’s computer generated and enhanced videos, this one is simply edited from film.

Still pretty sweet though.

slowartday:

"Ticket to The Guggenheim”89 x 42 cmPaper, acryl, pencils.
Maxim Santalov
maximsantalov.tumblr.com

slowartday:

"Ticket to The Guggenheim”
89 x 42 cm
Paper, acryl, pencils.

Maxim Santalov

maximsantalov.tumblr.com

1910-again:

Aleister Crowley, The Moon 1921

1910-again:

Aleister Crowley, The Moon 1921

massarrah:

Neo-Babylonian Protective Amulet

The obverse of this stone amulet (top photo) shows an image of the demon Ugallu, the lion-headed storm-demon typically depicted with a lion’s head, donkey ears, and the talons of a bird. On the reverse (bottom photo) is an Akkadian inscription in cuneiform. 

Neo-Babylonian, c. 626-539 BCE.

Musée d’art et d’histoire, Geneva. Photo courtesy of CDLI.

itscolossal:

Hot on the heels of a post earlier this week about centuries-old guide for mixing watercolors, I stumbled onto this 18th century instrument designed to measure the blueness of the sky called a Cyanometer. The simple device was invented in 1789 by Swiss physicist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure and German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt who used the circular array of 53 shaded sections in experiments above the skies over Geneva, Chamonix and Mont Blanc.
The Cyanometer helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.

itscolossal:

Hot on the heels of a post earlier this week about centuries-old guide for mixing watercolors, I stumbled onto this 18th century instrument designed to measure the blueness of the sky called a Cyanometer. The simple device was invented in 1789 by Swiss physicist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure and German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt who used the circular array of 53 shaded sections in experiments above the skies over Geneva, Chamonix and Mont Blanc.

The Cyanometer helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere.

I may have no money, but I know I have no regrets.
Might be the prettiest record I own.
#leveragemodels

I may have no money, but I know I have no regrets.
Might be the prettiest record I own.
#leveragemodels

Night in the Woods looks amazing.Check out the kickstarter hereI actually really want to play this

Night in the Woods looks amazing.
Check out the kickstarter here
I actually really want to play this

Book of the week:  Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler
(click-through link to original text in the picture)(UPDATE: english text found here)
The untranslated version in original Latin, donated to the online archive by Smithsonian, is a rather scientific view of the delicate balance of our universe for it’s time. Published in 1619, Kepler touches on congruence in geometrical forms and physical phenomena (a huge interest of mine, the relation of mathematics to real life things), with interesting mathematical diagrams worth checking out
The book is broken down into 5 lengthy chapters, the first is on regular polygons; the second is on the congruence and relation of said figures; the third is on the origin of harmonic proportions in music; the fourth is on Astrological aspects, harmonic configurations in astrology ; and the fifth on the harmony of the motions of the planets.
In 1619 this guy was making very accurate estimates of the minimum and maximum speeds of planets, and comparing them in relation to MUSIC in a MATHEMATICAL WAY, while challenging theosophistic views. If you can’t read this book, (i’m not going to pretend like I can) please check out THIS LINK ABOUT IT (click here!) SO FASCINATING.

Book of the week:  Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler

(click-through link to original text in the picture)
(UPDATE: english text found here)

The untranslated version in original Latin, donated to the online archive by Smithsonian, is a rather scientific view of the delicate balance of our universe for it’s time. Published in 1619, Kepler touches on congruence in geometrical forms and physical phenomena (a huge interest of mine, the relation of mathematics to real life things), with interesting mathematical diagrams worth checking out

The book is broken down into 5 lengthy chapters, the first is on regular polygons; the second is on the congruence and relation of said figures; the third is on the origin of harmonic proportions in music; the fourth is on Astrological aspects, harmonic configurations in astrology ; and the fifth on the harmony of the motions of the planets.

In 1619 this guy was making very accurate estimates of the minimum and maximum speeds of planets, and comparing them in relation to MUSIC in a MATHEMATICAL WAY, while challenging theosophistic views. If you can’t read this book, (i’m not going to pretend like I can) please check out THIS LINK ABOUT IT (click here!) SO FASCINATING.

slowartday:

Samuel Johnson, Clouds Rise

i wish my dreams were made of these

DEVISES ET EMBLEMES ANCIENNES & MODERNES, TIREES DE PLUS CELEBRES AUTEURS (Mottos and emblems, Ancient and modern, from the most famous authors) -1699

in French, German, Latin, and Italian.
(I roughly translated the title, i think it’s images and quotes/”mottos” by authors, my german and french are pretty rusty.)

a book of emblems and symbols from 1699, very interesting to look at. click-through link to the whole book to read online free here

in heaven, everything is fine

in heaven, everything is fine

Cats Meow, 30”x22”,acrylic on paper,2013

I love this guy’s art more and more every day.
check out http://gileslyon.tumblr.com/

some stare-worthy material